Sightseeing in the Cluster

Myridian Strip

Ezzara1

Solar Harvesters seemingly stand guard, for the long abandoned stations behind them.

Planning is an essential part to anyone’s success in New Eden. Be it a simple mining operation to earn a few million isk, or a full out assault on a neighboring alliance’s home systems, planning can often make or break the success of the operation. Good planning means taking account of all likely contingencies, which means looking not only at your objectives, but also who is likely to intervene to disrupt those objectives as much as possible.

Ezzara2

The Observation Platform and the Vacation Resort sit, slowly decaying within the nebula

It seems that the Amarr forgot this basic tenet of planning when they decided to set up the Myridian Strip. Situated near the gorgeous plasma clouds of Ezzara, the Strip was placed in prime location to take advantage of all the scenic wonders that the system has to offer as a vacation destination. The clouds themselves float a fair distance out from the central star, giving everything a much more diffuse glow than they would have had if closer to Ezzara. It seems that the prime location of the Resort worked: in the first few years of operations, visitors flocked to the Strip to watch the almost-hypnotic oscillations of the plasma clouds.

Ezzara3

Ezzara peeks over the top of the abandoned vacation resort.

And here is where the poor planning came in. Not only was Ezzara notable for the plasma clouds, but also because it was situated close, dangerously close, to Blood Raiders space. About five years after the Strip opened, the Raiders conducted a raid against the vacation resort. Despite the number of tourists present, protection was apparently light, though this is not all that surprising given the distance from high security space. Hundreds died as the Raiders swept through the station and nearby observation outposts. Within another year or two, the resort was shut down, and the Raiders took control of the area.

Ezzara4

A small asteroid base floats nearby. Whether it was part of the original resort or an addition by the Blood Raiders is not known

Today, the entire area is sparse. The plasma clouds themselves are still as gorgeous as ever, and give a romantic backdrop to an otherwise depressing scene. Both the vacation resort and the nearby observation outposts sit abandoned, and have drifted even closer to the plasma clouds. The abandoned stations are clearly showing their age, with numerous fractures and hull breaches throughout them both. Nearby, solar harvesters sit, still absorbing the meager sunlight despite the fact that their main stations no longer need the additional power. Also nearby are a number of asteroid colonies. They still seem active to me: the Professor’s sensor detect power output and the plasma vents still burst plasma out every few seconds. I can’t tell if the bases were part of the original site or if the Blood Raiders added them after the fact.

Ezzara5

The entirety of the Myridian Strip complex

As Professor Science maneuvered around the site, I took the opportunity to enjoy the nearby plasma clouds. It was a pity that the operation simply fell apart. Boosting protection of the site should have been more than enough to keep the Raiders at bay, but it was simply not to be. After a few minutes, it was time for me to head back. I took a point of carefully planning my route: more than anything else, the story of the Myridian Strip reminded me of the importance of planning to make sure disaster doesn’t strike.

Basic Information:

  • Attraction: Myridian Strip
  • System: Ezzara
  • Security Rating: 0.1
  • Region: Devoid
  • Potential Hazards: Getting to Ezzara involves low sec travel.  Pirates and gate camps should be expected.  A cov ops or other cloaking ship is recommended.  Additionally, the site is surprisingly large, clocking in at around 200 km from end to end.  Rats can be found on both ends of the site, including cruisers.
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